blanching rash What is the Tanakh? What is the difference between the Tanakh &amp

blanching rash What is the Tanakh? What is the difference between the Tanakh &amp


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What is the Tanakh? What is the difference between the Tanakh & the OT?

What is the Tanakh?

Tanakh is an acronym that refers to the Jewish Bible. The Tanakh consists of

Torah – the five books of Moses (Pentateuch)

Nevi’im (Prophets) – Joshuah, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekile, the 12 Prophets

Ketuvim (Writings) – Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Song of Songs, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehmemiah,Chronicles

What is the difference between Old Testament and the Tanakh?

The majority of texts in the Old Testament and the Tanakh are identical.

Old Testament refers to the Christian Bible, containing Jewish books that were preserved in by the Greek-speaking Church but not by the synagogue. Some churches have different orders and contain different books .

The main difference between the Old Testament and Tanakh lies in the way in which they are read and understood. Many Christians–although this is changing–read the Old Testament through the New Testament, i.e. see it fulfilled in Jesus and full of prophecies talking of the Christian Messiah.

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  • Katja Vehlow

    Katja Vehlow

    Katja Vehlow

    I teach Religious and Jewish Studies at the University of South Carolina and currently live in New York City.
    In my professional life, I wrote a book on the medieval historian and philosopher Abraham ibn Daud’s Dorot Olam (http://tinyurl.com/kl6fll2).

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